destroycomics

destroycomics:

wordbookstores:

You like mail and signed books, right? Right! These wonderful authors would be delighted to help you with that. Preorder their books now, get ‘em signed, sealed, and delivered to your door when they come out:

We also have signed copies of Damien Echols’s and Lorri Davis’s books available on an ongoing basis. Personalizations will be available as the authors’ schedules permit. Please note “Signed Copy Request” and any other details in the comments field during checkout!

Visit our website for more details.

Aurora West is great!

You guys!  You can pre-order signed copies of Paul Pope’s The Rise of Aurora West and Cory Doctorow and Jen Wang’s In Real Life through WORD!

zackules

cheerupbrigade asked:

How do you approach writing for characters that go beyond your own perspective or personal experience? I've often heard that writers use people they know from real life as a way to write characters, but what if you don't have someone in mind that matches a character you want to write?

zackules answered:

 This is a great question. I often hear people assert that certain writers shouldn’t ever write certain characters because they themselves can “never understand” what that character has gone through. That is complete and utter bull. The entire job of a storyteller is to get into someone else’s skin and tell their story in a meaningful and compelling way. If the former were true, then all my characters would be hairy, white cartoonists in their 30’s.

I think observing others, whether real or fictitious, IS a good jumping off point. I also think it’s useful to simplify a character, particularly at the start. I always repeat this nugget of wisdom: “A strong character can be described in one or two words that do not reflect their race, gender or occupation”. 

So, ok. That’s a good way to start. But what about writing a character you yourself have very little in common with? Here’s what I think…

Each and every one of us has the capacity for every action, emotion, and experience in the spectrum of human behavior, but to varying degrees. You ever see someone completely devastated and inconsolable about the cancelation of a show you’ve barely even heard of? To me, it’s about tapping into the basic action, thought, or motivation of a character within myself, and then dialing up or dialing down the frequency. We all know what it’s like to feel like an outsider, even if it’s something as banal as having not been invited to a birthday party when you were 12. How can that feeling be applied? Tap into those feelings and emotions and bring them to the level that your character is feeling. 

Do I know what it’s like to stare down the gullet of a rampaging snowbeast? No. Has a dog ever growled and frightened me in my life? Sure. Have I ever had the shit kicked out of me by people in a different social standing? Not really. Have I ever been in a scuffle that started to go a bit too far or been mocked by others? Of course. All experiences and emotions stem from a single place, but it’s a question of degrees and intensity. 

Not only do I think that this is useful in writing characters that you have no frame of reference for (you do), but is also a way to have empathy for real people in real life. We CAN understand, if we take a minute to think about it. 

Zack Giallongo has interesting insight about character development!

10paezinhos
10paezinhos:

I’ve been asked to do a pin up to help celebrate Gene Luen Yang and Sonny Liew’s upcoming graphic novel, The Shadow Hero, which tells the origin story of the first Asian-American superhero, the Green Turtle. I read the book and did the image above, also a homage to a classic Mazzuchelli Batman image.
As I was reading it, and as the story reflected the classic “origin of a hero” tale, as well as the symbolic power of animals (the chinese mythology part was greatly handled), it reminded me of another origin story of a super hero, also told much after the creation of the character itself, in which shadow and an animal’s symbolic power are present. It was a good feeling to have while reading it, and that’s how my image came about.
The Shadow Hero has the right mix of humour, mythology, symbology and the right amount of action. I hope you check it out.

This version of The Green Turtle by Fabio Moon is fantastic!

10paezinhos:

I’ve been asked to do a pin up to help celebrate Gene Luen Yang and Sonny Liew’s upcoming graphic novel, The Shadow Hero, which tells the origin story of the first Asian-American superhero, the Green Turtle. I read the book and did the image above, also a homage to a classic Mazzuchelli Batman image.

As I was reading it, and as the story reflected the classic “origin of a hero” tale, as well as the symbolic power of animals (the chinese mythology part was greatly handled), it reminded me of another origin story of a super hero, also told much after the creation of the character itself, in which shadow and an animal’s symbolic power are present. It was a good feeling to have while reading it, and that’s how my image came about.

The Shadow Hero has the right mix of humour, mythology, symbology and the right amount of action. I hope you check it out.

This version of The Green Turtle by Fabio Moon is fantastic!

dansantat
dansantat:

I was recently invited to be part of the stellar line-up of cartoonists to celebrate Gene Luen Yang and Sonny Liew’s new graphic novel from First Second, THE SHADOW HERO. I’ve been a fan of both these guys for years. I’ve admired Gene’s work ever since the publication of his stellar book, American Born Chinese, and up to his most recent, Boxers & Saints. I remember seeing Sonny’s work for the first time in an edition of the Flight Anthology and I have followed him ever since. 
Imagine a story about a slightly overbearing Asian mother pushing his kid to become a superhero instead of a doctor and you get The Green Turtle. Listen to Gene talk about the book on NPR’S Morning Edition 

Dan Santat draws a phenomenal Green Turtle!

dansantat:

I was recently invited to be part of the stellar line-up of cartoonists to celebrate Gene Luen Yang and Sonny Liew’s new graphic novel from First Second, THE SHADOW HERO. I’ve been a fan of both these guys for years. I’ve admired Gene’s work ever since the publication of his stellar book, American Born Chinese, and up to his most recent, Boxers & Saints. I remember seeing Sonny’s work for the first time in an edition of the Flight Anthology and I have followed him ever since. 

Imagine a story about a slightly overbearing Asian mother pushing his kid to become a superhero instead of a doctor and you get The Green Turtle. Listen to Gene talk about the book on NPR’S Morning Edition 

Dan Santat draws a phenomenal Green Turtle!

spx

wellnotwisely:

The coolest news this morning: First Second are publishing Bastien Vivès, Mickaël Sanlaville, and Michael Balak’s Lastman for English language readers. The series is currently on its fourth volume in France, and is inspired by gaming and Japanese comics, specifically shounen manga, following Adrian Velba, a happy 12-year old enrolled in Battle School under Master Jansen, and looking forward to participating in the annual largest martial arts tournament sponsored by the king and queen. However, disaster strikes as a few hours to the close of nominations, his partner pulls out, sick, and Adrian, requiring a partner in order to register finds help offered from an unlikely source. 

More here.

We agree; this is pretty cool!